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Taliban Assault Journalists Covering Women’s Rights Protest in Kabul

According to the reports, a group of 20 women marched from the ministry of education to the ministry of finance in Kabul

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Ishita Chakraborty
Ishita Chakraborty
Ishita Chakraborty is a computer engineer, a journalist in training, a social activist, a youth activist for PETA India, and a linguaphile. She covers social issues, UN initiatives, and diversity.

AFGHANISTAN: Taliban militants thrashed several journalists to prevent media coverage of a women’s rights protest in Kabul on Thursday. According to the reports, a group of 20 women marched from the ministry of education to the ministry of finance in Kabul.

As per the reports, the militants beat a foreign journalist with the butt of a rifle. Along with this, two more journalists were kicked and punched by members of the insurgent group.

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During the protest, women were seen holding placards that read “Joblessness, poverty, hunger” and chanting slogans like “Don’t politicize education”. 

The eyewitnesses claimed that the Taliban authorities allowed the women to walk for around an hour and a half before attacking them.

Taliban violating women’s rights

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After taking power, the Taliban directed all its resources to strengthen its military to keep its hold over the country. Due to this, social causes like women’s education and rights are completely out of question. The insurgent group has banned girls from receiving secondary education in Afghanistan.

Since the Taliban seized power in mid-August, high school girls have been banned from returning to classes while many women have been banned from returning to work.

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Zahra Mohammadi, one of the protest organizers said, “The situation is that the Taliban don’t respect anything: not journalists — foreign and local — or women.”

Earlier this month, the extremist group beheaded an Afghanistan junior women’s national volleyball team player. A junior woman player named Mahjabin Hakimi was killed by them. The gruesome murder was kept undercover as the militants threatened Hakimi’s family to not disclose the murder to anyone.

From 1996 to 2001, the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan controlled over three-quarters of Afghanistan and enforced a strict interpretation of Sharia law. During this time, the Taliban barred women and girls from public life without a male relative.

The Taliban have now taken over the entire country. After nearly two decades of fighting against foreign armies, the militant group invaded and captured Afghanistan on August 15. 

Also Read: Two Afghan Journalists Beaten In Afghanistan For Covering Women’s Protest In Kabul

Author

  • Ishita Chakraborty

    Ishita Chakraborty is a computer engineer, a journalist in training, a social activist, a youth activist for PETA India, and a linguaphile. She covers social issues, UN initiatives, and diversity.

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