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Saturday, January 28, 2023

5 Mesmerizing Images of Our Universe Which Were Released in 2022

In this article, we have compiled the pictures clicked by NASA

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Russell Chattaraj
Russell Chattaraj
Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

UNITED STATES: This year has been remarkable for telescopes and space probes as they took brilliant pictures of the dark cosmos and cosmic objects.

Asteroid Dimorphos

Photo Credit: Twitter/@NASAJPL

NASA’s Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) spacecraft collided with the asteroid Dimorphos on September 26 after travelling 11 million kilometres from Earth in nine months. 

The experiment, which aimed to see if it was possible to change the trajectory of an asteroid by crashing a probe into it, was a complete success.

This is the image taken just before the probe collided with the asteroid.

Jupiter

Photo Credit: Instagram/@nasawebb
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These fantastic images were captured by the observatory’s near-infrared camera (NIRCam), which has three specialised infrared filters that highlight the peculiarities of the planet. Infrared light has been mapped onto the visible spectrum because it cannot be seen by the human eye.

The longest wavelengths often appear redder, whereas the shortest wavelengths typically appear more blue. In order to turn the Webb data into pictures, scientists and citizen scientist Judy Schmidt collaborated.

Pillars of Creation 

Photo Credit: Twitter/NASA

The James Webb Space Telescope of NASA has captured these images of the famous Pillars of Creation, where new stars are emerging amid thick clouds of gas and dust.

Researchers were able to update their models of star formation with the help of Webb’s fresh picture of the Pillars of Creation, which NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope originally made famous when it captured them in 1995.

Earthrise from Orion 

Photo Credit: Twitter/@NASAArtemis
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The image was captured during the Artemis I mission, which sent an unmanned vehicle around the moon and back to prepare for an astronaut’s return in 2025.

Every day, satellites and the International Space Station send us images of Earth. However, when we view ourselves from the other side of the moon, something is different.

The actual “Earthrise” image was first taken by the Apollo 8 crew in 1968. 

Sun

Photo Credit: Twitter/NASA

The European Solar Orbiter captured this stunning image. This image revealed the most fine details of the corona (the Sun’s outer atmosphere).

The pictures were shot on March 7 when the Solar Orbiter was 46 million miles (75 million kilometres) from Earth and the sun, or exactly halfway between them.

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Also Read: Asteroid 2019 OR1 to Make Close Approach towards Earth Today

Author

  • Russell Chattaraj

    Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

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