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Friday, February 3, 2023

A Solar Storm Showcased Pink Auroras in Norway

The solar storm caused a profusion of highly rare pink auroras

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Russell Chattaraj
Russell Chattaraj
Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

NORWAY: Since the sun is in the middle of its 11-year solar cycle, solar activity and production have increased recently.

More geomagnetic storms are anticipated to occur on Earth when the sun hits the top of its solar cycle. Over the past few days, powerful coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have been seen emanating from the sun.

None, however, has had a physical impact on the planet as severe as the storm that struck on November 3.

A solar storm that caused a temporary rupture in the Earth’s magnetic field on November 3 caused a profusion of highly rare pink auroras to light up the skies above Norway.

According to Spaceweather.com, the magnetosphere hole closed in 6 hours. A bizarre blue light ribbon also appeared over Sweden at this time.

Experienced aurora guide Markus Varik and his crew saw the pink aurora, which was visible for two minutes.

Auroras are atmospheric light shows that can be seen in the Earth’s sky. They provide a flowing light show that is very enticing. Green auroras are typical in the sky, whereas pink auroras are rare.

In his Live Science interview, Markus Varik noted, “These were the brightest pink auroras I have seen in more than a decade of leading tours.” “It was an odd experience.”

When solar winds, which are very energetic charged particles, travel through the magnetosphere of Earth, auroras are produced.

Since auroral displays are just a blending of numerous colours, pink is barely discernible in auroral displays that are only linked to high solar activity.

However, experts are unsure if this peculiar event was a novel type of aurora caused by the disrupted magnetosphere or if it resulted from something else.

Also Read: Two Back-to-Back Solar Flares May Trigger Auroras

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  • Russell Chattaraj
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    Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

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