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Thursday, December 8, 2022

“A Train to Moon”: Japan Announces a Major Space Migration Program

Kajima Construction and experts from Kyoto University unveiled their cutting-edge designs at a press conference

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Russell Chattaraj
Russell Chattaraj
Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

JAPAN: New designs for an artificial space colony and an interplanetary train system linking the Earth, Moon, and Mars have just been revealed by Japanese researchers. At a press conference last week, Kajima Construction and experts from Kyoto University unveiled their cutting-edge designs.

According to the Independent, Yosuke Yamashiki, director of the SIC Human Spaceology Center at Kyoto University, stated during the news conference that “there is no plan like this in other countries’ space development plans.”

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According to Yamashiki, “Our plan represents significant technologies that are essential to assuring that humans will be able to travel to space in the future.”

Our strategy “represents significant technologies that are essential to ensuring that humans will be able to fly to space in the future,” according to Yamashiki.

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In order to minimise the “weakening” of the human musculoskeletal system in zero and low gravity conditions, the Japanese researchers intend to create a “Glass” habitat living structure that duplicates Earth’s gravity, topography, and atmosphere.

They disclosed that to simulate the gravity of the Earth, which is six times larger than that of the Moon, rotational motions will be used to create centrifugal force.

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The researchers want to construct “The Glass,” a conical living structure with artificial gravity that includes amenities like public transportation, parks, and water bodies that mirror those found on Earth. The habitats on the Moon and Mars will be referred to as “Lunaglass” and “Marsglass,” respectively.

According to The Independent, while a full-scale version would probably take a further 70 years, a simpler version could be finished by 2050.

This is happening at a time when numerous nations around the world are preparing to build permanent bases on the Moon. NASA, an American space agency, wants to send people back to the moon no early than 2025. The International Lunar Research Station, a cooperative project of China and Russia, also has a similar timetable.

Additionally, it follows a NASA warning regarding the dangers of extended weightlessness and low gravity on one’s health. Among the effects of prolonged life outside of Earth for astronauts returning from the International Space Station include declining bone density, muscle loss, and diminished vision.

Also Read: NASA Launches a New Initiative That Allows People to Become a Jovian Vortex Hunter

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  • Russell Chattaraj

    Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

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