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Thursday, September 29, 2022

Asteroid 2022 KY4 Will Be Passing Closest to Earth Than Ever Before

Asteroid 2022 KY4 is projected to move at a speed of 16,900 miles per hour (27,000 kilometres per hour) and will come the closest to Earth on July 17

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Russell Chattaraj
Russell Chattaraj
Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

UNITED STATES: Once more, asteroids are approaching the Earth’s surface very closely. Astronomers have warned about the approach of a massive asteroid that will be closest to Earth on July 17. Earlier, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) discovered a small asteroid only 41 feet wide and was approaching our planet.

The 2022 KY4 asteroid is nearly the size of a 50-story skyscraper. It is around 290 feet broad and will be closest to Earth in about 100 years.

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The asteroid 2022 NF, which passed by within 56,000 miles (90,000 kilometres) on July 7, is far closer than this. 

An estimated 16,900 mph (27,000 km/hr) is the speed at which the asteroid 2022 KY4 is moving. Compared to a speedy rifle bullet, it moves about eight times faster. In 1959 and 1948, it previously got close to Earth. According to NASA, the asteroid won’t come this near to Earth again until May 2048.

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The US organisation keeps track of cosmic objects that pass by Earth at various times, together with other agencies. Notably, although being affected by the gravity of a larger entity, an asteroid seldom shifts off its orbit and might strike the Earth in exceptional circumstances.

NASA and other space organisations are continually thinking about planetary defence. In November 2021, NASA launched the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART), a spacecraft that can divert asteroids. This year, this spacecraft is anticipated to collide with the 525-foot-wide asteroid Dimorphous.

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The collision will somewhat alter the asteroid’s orbit, but it won’t be completely destroyed.

Also Read: NASA Releases List of Dazzling Celestial Objects for Webb Telescope’s Debut Images

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  • Russell Chattaraj

    Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

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