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Thursday, October 6, 2022

Over 1700 MT Dangerous Unexploded Ordnance Detonated

The mission began in February 2021 and ended on Friday on the occasion of the Army Ordnance Corps' 247th Cops Day

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Raju Vernekar
Raju Vernekar
Raju Vermekar is a senior Mumbai-based journalist who have worked with many daily newspapers. Raju contributes on versatile topics.

INDIA. Mumbai: On Friday, the Central Ammunition Depot (CAD), located in Pulgaon, Wardha district, Maharashtra, disposed of the final batch of unexploded ordnance (UXO)/explosive remnants of war (ERW) seized from ports across India as part of Operation Visphotak Mukt Bandargah (explosive free ports).

As part of the operation, teams were dispatched to various ports for neutralization and the safe return of these unused explosives to CAD Pulgaon.

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The mission began in February 2021 and ended on Friday on the occasion of the Army Ordnance Corps’ 247th Corps Day, according to government sources. The Central Ammunition Depot (CAD) is a military installation that houses Asia’s second-largest ammunition depot.

The sensitive operation of neutralizing and destroying over 1700 Metric Tonnes of dangerous Unexploded Ordnances and Explosive Remnants of War lying across several ports around the country concluded in the disposal phase of the 247th Raising of the Army Ordnance Corps.

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Unexploded ordnance (UXO) and abandoned explosive ordnance (AXO) make up the ERW, but not mine. Weapons that do not detonate as intended are classified as unexploded ordnance (UXO). Bombs, rockets, grenades, artillery shells, flares, mortars, and hazardous residues that may linger after a partial or failed detonation are some types of UXO.

UXOs are explosive ordnance that has been fused, armed, or otherwise prepared for use. They may have been fired, dropped, launched, or projected yet remain unexplored, usually through malfunction.

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It is estimated that between 10-30% of ordnance does not explode on impact. UXOs are usually made of metal, but can also be made of plastic/composite material.

If they have been in the open for a long time, they may be rusted and discolored, partially hidden, obscured by dirt and mud, and difficult to recognize. Despite looking harmless, they remain extremely dangerous unless removed by qualified personnel.

Army Ordnance Corps came into existence with the establishment of the ‘Board of Ordnance’ on April 08, 1775. The Corps is entrusted with the onerous task of managing a large and complex inventory and providing logistic support to the Army.

Also Read: Defence Minister Releases a List of Weapons to be Procured Indigenously

Author

  • Raju Vernekar

    Raju Vermekar is a senior Mumbai-based journalist who have worked with many daily newspapers. Raju contributes on versatile topics.

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