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Panna National Park: A Gem Among India’s Tiger Reserves

The National Park is a well-kept park with grasslands, dense forests, hills, hilly terrain, rivers, and a wide range of tree species

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Suman Bajpai
Suman Bajpai
Freelance writer, journalist, editor, translator and travel writer, Worked with different magazines as an editor. Writing for past 33 years

INDIA: The thrill of being in a jeep safari, especially early in the morning when standing in front of the gate, is always high. The entrance of Panna National Park, a famous tiger reserve in Central India, is located in Madla, adjacent to the UNESCO world heritage site of Khajuraho, and allows visitors to explore the world of animals, vegetation, and fauna while watching the stars and the moon.

Madhya Pradesh Tourism is one such tourism that welcomes visitors with open arms and delivers the greatest possible hospitality so that when they return, they will have a treasure trove of memories and experiences.

Scenic exquisiteness

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Panna National park draws wildlife enthusiasts, photographers, authors, and tourists back again and again. This forest, which covers 543 square kilometres, includes a “no visitation” zone where animals can spend their days as they like. Only about a quarter of this region is open to the public. It is a spot where one may see some of the world’s most dangerous animals, as well as flowing waterfalls and vultures.

This reserve, along with the Ken Ghariyal Sanctuary and vulture conversation center, is home to many species of animals. Apart from Chinkara, tiger, leopard, Indian wolf, four-horned antelope, rusty-spotted cat, gharial, chousingha, porcupine, chital, nilgai, sambhar, sloth bear, monkey, it is the habitat of more than 200 species of birds.

Photo Credit: MP Tourism
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The honey buzzard, bar-headed geese, blossom-headed parakeet, hawk-eagle, and others are just a few examples. Peacocks dancing, deers galloping, and monkeys climbing trees are all stunning sights.

The grey langurs hanging from one limb to another like naughty toddlers were the most fascinating.

A close-up of a tiger

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The National Park is a well-kept park with grasslands, dense forests, hills, hilly terrain, rivers, and a wide range of tree species. The dawn can be seen on a morning safari, and the sunset can be seen on an evening safari. It’s possible that, like sunrise and sunset on beaches, a national park can be as captivating.

It is unavoidable to observe tiger pug markings on the ground while driving by. Imagining that a tiger has just passed by makes one ecstatic, and their desire to see that wonderful animal grows exponentially. The reserve has two gates, one named Madla and the other named Hinouta.

Typically, guides prefer to enter through Hinouta gate since the sighting of the tiger is more likely along that route. Because there is no pre-determined itinerary that visitors must follow, they are free to turn and follow their own pathways.

The tranquil water of the river

The Ken River flows through the park’s ravines and gorges, covering the majority of the woodland. It’s a tributary of the Yamuna River. 

The national park and its rich species rely on this river for survival.

Tigresses usually seek locations near waterfalls or riverbanks to give birth to and nurture their offspring. River Ken is a sanctuary for nature enthusiasts and photographers, as it is home to the long-snout gharial, python, and other aquatic animals.

Boating is also available through the tourism department. If the serene water soothes the soul while boating, viewing the diverse range of birds near the river is a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

Tourists receive the indication to be attentive while listening to the distress call and witnessing rushing deer and other animals, as this is a sign of a tiger approaching. Then all of the vehicles would turn around and sprint to find the tiger.

The Ken Ghariyal sanctuary is the cold-blooded underwater hunters’ natural habitat. Vulture Point, a massive gorge in the tiger reserve, is where the enormous birds can be viewed in their natural habitat.

The Panna Tiger Reserve has a tropical climate. Dry teak trees and dry mixed forest thrive in its Vindhya soil. The park’s principal vegetation consists of diverse dry deciduous woods intermingled with grassland areas. There are tendu, mahua, sajal, bel, salai, and teak trees here.

Also Read: Khajuraho Dance Festival: A Celebration of Life

Author

  • Suman Bajpai

    Freelance writer, journalist, editor, translator and travel writer, Worked with different magazines as an editor. Writing for past 33 years

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