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Saturday, February 4, 2023

Spooky Sound of Earth’s Magnetic Field is a Halloween Treat

The magnetic impulses were turned into sound by researchers from the Technical University of Denmark

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Russell Chattaraj
Russell Chattaraj
Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

DENMARK: It is impossible to physically perceive the magnetic field, this is the same field of complexity that shields Earth from solar wind-borne charged particles and cosmic radiation. But for the first time, scientists have released the sound of the magnetic field.

Researchers unveiled the sound of Earth’s magnetic field

The magnetic impulses were turned into sound by researchers from the Technical University of Denmark, and they sound frightening. Click here to listen to the spooky sound.

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The magnetic field which surrounds our planet is also known as the magnetosphere. Earth has the strongest magnetosphere of all the rocky planets in our solar system; under the protection of this magnetic environment, life on Earth first evolved and is still sustained today.

A 3,000 km-deep ocean of superheated, whirling liquid iron that makes up the outer core is chiefly responsible for producing the magnetic field. Despite being produced beneath the globe, it has an impact on the atmosphere above us.

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Our planet’s magnetosphere protects it from dangerous solar and cosmic ray radiation as well as the solar wind, a steady stream of charged particles that stream from the Sun and constantly erode the atmosphere.

Some of the energy from the collisions between the charged particles from the Sun and the atoms and molecules in the upper atmosphere, primarily oxygen and nitrogen, results in the greenish-blue light we know as the aurora borealis.

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Using three Swarm satellites that were launched in 2013, the European Space Agency (ESA) has been attempting to discover the mysteries of the Earth’s magnetic field.

By carefully studying the magnetic signals that originate not only from the Earth’s core but also from the mantle, crust, and seas, as well as from the ionosphere and magnetosphere, scientists are attempting to better understand how the magnetic field is formed.

The purpose, according to the European Space Agency, is to remind people that the magnetic field exists and that, despite its ominous rumble, life on Earth depends on it.

“At Copenhagen’s Solbjerg Square, we had access to a highly interesting sound system made up of more than 30 underground loudspeakers,” according to Klaus Nielsen, Musician and project supporter from the Technical University of Denmark.

“We have put it up so that each speaker symbolises a different spot on Earth and shows how our magnetic field has changed over the previous 100,000 years,” he added.

Also Read: Solarflare Caused a Geomagnetic Storm and Cracked Open Earth’s Magnetic Field for 14 Hours

Author

  • Russell Chattaraj

    Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

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