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Sudan To Return To Civilian Rule Soon

The Forces for Freedom and Change (FFC) said there is a plan “To file the new constitutional declaration to the political and revolutionary forces after its approval early next week”

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Mohammed Yakubu
Mohammed Yakubu
Mohammed Yakubu is an investigative journalist reporting on public health, human rights, climate change, education, gender issues, and much more.

AFRICA.Sudan: Nine months after military leaders in Sudan failed to constitute a new transitional government, they are calling upon political forces and peace groups to agree on a new government.

Given this, the Forces for Freedom and Change (FFC) said there is a plan “to file the new constitutional declaration to the political and revolutionary forces after its approval early next week,” according to Sudan Tribune.

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Wagdi Salih, a leading member of the coalition revealed that the coalition would submit the new constitutional declaration to the political and civil forces, after its approval at the Central Council meeting next Saturday.

He said, “The new declaration stipulates that power will not be shared with the military leaders who currently rule the country or the military establishment, and speaks of a civilian authority and a parliamentary system.”

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Salih, however, noted that military formation is integral to civilian authority as it is part of the state institutions commanded by the former.

Further, Salih said the declaration addresses the state structures and governance, based on the coalition’s vision put forward last June.

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Reacting to news that the military leaders are trying to impose a new prime minister, General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, Chairman of the Sovereign Council refuted the reports, saying it is “baseless”.

Al-Burhan refuted the claim during a meeting with the French Ambassador to Sudan Raja Rabia. However, he reiterated his thrust to completely return the country to democratic rule.That, according to him would be done through holding free and fair elections. 

In 2019, Sudan experienced a power grab unrest that ousted Omar al-Bashir, one of Africa’s longest-ruling leaders.

Sadly, the October 25, 2021 coup led by Al-Burhan further intensified Sudan’s power crisis. The country’s prime minister, Abdalla Hamdok was placed under house detention. He was later reinstated.

Following the tussle, the civilian government led by Hamdok and military leaders made a power-sharing agreement until the country returned to civilian rule. But this did not last long as protests against the military resurfaced. 

Reports said the protesters were insecure about Hamdok’s reinstatement. They argue that it was a way of legitimizing continuous military rule. In response to this, Hamdok resigned his position as the prime minister, perhaps to allow for the transitional arrangement.

ALSO READ: “18 Million Sudanese to Experience Extreme Hunger by September,” World Bank 

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  • Mohammed Yakubu

    Mohammed Yakubu is an investigative journalist reporting on public health, human rights, climate change, education, gender issues, and much more.

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