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Friday, September 30, 2022

Tezpur University Scholar Spots Distant Dwarf Galaxy Formation

Anshuman Borgohain conducted research with astronomers from the United States and France

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Russell Chattaraj
Russell Chattaraj
Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

INDIA: According to an article by a research scientist at Tezpur University, a groundbreaking investigation has discovered new stars growing beyond the visible bounds between 1.5 and 3.9 billion light-years from Earth.

“It is still unknown how historical dwarf galaxies changed to become the ones we see today. The process of their assembly over cosmic eras is seen as one of the crucial pieces to complete the picture of galaxy formation and evolution,” According to a study published this month in the interdisciplinary science publication “Nature”.

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It has been a wonder how some small galaxies like these can have such active star formation, according to Bruce Elmegreen, a principal research staff member in the IBM research division in the United States and another participant in the study.

According to a press statement from Tezpur University, the study was conceptualized utilizing the ultraviolet imaging telescope (UVIT) onboard AstroSat, India’s first dedicated multi-wavelength space observatory. It noted that the imaging capabilities of the AstroSat/UVIT have made intriguing new directions in the study of extragalactic astronomy possible.

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The article’s co-authors Rupjyoti Gogoi of Tezpur University and Prof. Kanak Saha of the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, jointly supervise Borgohain’s work.

Saha has detected these very youthful, weak, and huge star-forming clumps thanks to UV deep field imaging techniques and the resolving power of AstroSat, India’s first dedicated multi-wavelength satellite observatory.
According to Gogoi, the current research serves as an example for the nation’s young scientists because it uses information from AstroSat, an indigenous satellite of India.

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According to Tezpur university vice-chancellor Vinod K. Jain, “the discovery of such unexplained events in these far-off dwarf galaxies is simply another piece of the puzzle, and a peek of the unknown that new state-of-the-art observatories are starting to exhibit and have to provide in the near future.”

Also Read: First Dormant Black Hole Found in Another Galaxy

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  • Russell Chattaraj

    Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

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