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Friday, January 27, 2023

From Burj Khalifa to Hampi: 5 Architectural Marvels from around the World

We have compiled a list of some of the most beautifully designed pieces of architecture across the globe

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Russell Chattaraj
Russell Chattaraj
Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

INDIA: Even though spectacular architectural pieces are being made in the world with the help of modern technology and science, there are also phenomenal ancient architectures that leave us in awe. 

Nature has created several such marvels. Inspired by these, humans have engineered some excellent structures, structures that are intricate, and extremely complex.

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Recently, in India’s Gujarat state, the Morbi bridge collapsed. The reason behind the collapse of the medieval suspension bridge is still being investigated.

The cause of the small walkway’s collapse has come under scrutiny, as has the responsibility of the electrical manufacturing business in charge of maintaining the colonial-era building, which was just made accessible to the public last week after repairs.

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Structures like this could see a possible failure if not maintained from time to time. However, several structures still stand strong. We have put forth a list of some of the most beautifully designed pieces of architecture across the world.

Burj Khalifa

The Burj Khalifa is an impressive skyscraper, which serves as the centrepiece of downtown Dubai, is 828.9 meters (almost a kilometre) tall. Construction on the 160-floor structure began in 2004, and six years later, in 2010, it was completed and occupied.

Photo Credit: Instagram/alwaysdubailife
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The Chicago branch of the American architectural and engineering firm Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill LLP were in charge of its design. A Y-shaped tripartite floor was used to maximize the amount of hotel and residential space, and the building’s remarkable height is supported by a central core and buttressed wings.

Petronas Towers

The Petronas Twin Skyscrapers, which dominated the Kuala Lumpur skyline from 1998 to 2004, were the highest twin towers in the world during that time (452 m). They have since shaped local history and given Malaysia a well-deserved international reputation.

The building’s spectacular combination of stainless steel and glass finishing creates lovely Islamic patterns that are intended to evoke the handicrafts and weaving patterns found in Malaysia.

Photo Credit: petronas.org

Due to the inclusion of 590,000 square feet of laminated glass over the surface of the tower, which would take 2 full months to simply clean each and every glass panel, the building, which was constructed with 899,000 square feet of stainless-steel extrusions, was remarkably devoid of heat and UV radiation.

Hampi

Hampi is a UNESCO World Heritage Site because of the numerous old temples, forts, and other buildings there.

Hampi, which some sources claim was the world’s second-largest metropolis around 1500 AD, served as the Vijayanagar Empire’s capital at the time.

Boulders of various sizes surround Hampi, and with a little effort, you can climb to the top of them to get a breathtaking view of the entire city and the surrounding area. The terrain is just as mysterious as the ruins themselves.

Photo Credit: Twitter/VK84015570

In Hampi, which is known for its enormous, exquisitely carved temples, the surviving buildings tell their own tales. Many tourists scale the Matangaparvata to gain a view of Hampi and its surroundings. The city’s construction, complete with temples and bazaars, is exceptional in and of itself.

Atomium

For Expo 58, the Atomium was built in 1958. The futuristic building represents the atomic age, the immense power of atomic energy, and its peaceful application in science.

Aluminum was initially used for the construction’s exterior. However, a steel coat was applied to it during the renovation in 2006.

The structure is 102 meters (335 feet) tall and is made up of nine connected spheres that depict a simple iron crystal that has been magnified 165 billion times.

Photo Credit: Atomium.be

Each of the 8 spheres at the structure’s apexes and the central sphere has a diameter of 18 metres (59 feet), making up the Atomium. Twenty tubes, each measuring 29 metres, connect the nine spheres. Three auxiliary structures serve as the composition’s foundation.

Millau Viaduct

The Millau viaduct spans a 2-kilometer valley in the Massif Central mountain range, rising 270 metres above the river at its highest point. It is 2.4 km long.

The seven piers of the Millau Viaduct are divided into an inverted V shape and recessed into reinforced concrete pyramidal shafts. The shrouds are distributed in semi-harps and anchored.

The Millau Viaduct is unusual in that it is not straight. A little bend can reduce the floating feeling that drivers could have on a straight road. The radius of the curve is 20 kilometers. In addition, the road features a moderate inclination of 3% for better sight and driver comfort.

Photo Credit: YouTube/Science Channel

Also Read: Understanding the Eiffel Tower, a Marvel of Engineering from the 1800s

Author

  • Russell Chattaraj

    Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

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