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Friday, September 30, 2022

Elon Musk Now Wants CERN’s Large Hadron Collider

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world's biggest and most potent particle accelerator that is underground in Geneva

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Russell Chattaraj
Russell Chattaraj
Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

UNITED STATES: At this point, it shouldn’t be surprising that Elon Musk has come back and twitted a meme dubbing CERN’s Large Hadron Collider “demonic technology”. Elon Musk expressed his desire to utilise the CERN big hadron collider in a post. In the post, he is portrayed as trustworthy and normal with demonic technology that has never been seen before.

CERN’s Large Hadron Collider

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world’s biggest and most potent particle accelerator that is underground in Geneva, Switzerland. With the assistance of more than 10,000 scientists, hundreds of colleges and research institutes, and more than 100 companies, the European Organization for Nuclear Research created the Large Hadron Collider.

The Large Hadron Collider in CERN. Photo Credit: Twitter
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Six weeks after CERN had restarted the Large Hadron Collider, Elon tweeted the meme six weeks and six hours later. Elon published a meme with the message, “Please let me use the CERN Large Hadron Collider. I am an everyday person who can be trusted with obscenely advanced technology.”

The Large Hadron Collider is looking for dark matter in an effort to make a discovery that could fundamentally alter science. It accomplishes this via its own special accelerator. The universe’s stars, planets, and galaxies make up barely 5% of its total mass, claim scientists at CERN.

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Recently SpaceX, which Elon Musk owns, has launched 37 satellites into orbit as of this writing in 2022, 23 of which were dedicated Starlink flights. This launch cadence beats the company’s previous record of 31, set in 2021, for the most orbital flights completed in a calendar year.

A few hours before the most recent Starlink flight, a robotic Dragon supply ship from SpaceX departed the International Space Station. The Dragon returned to Earth on August 20 by splashing down in the ocean.

One of the shots of Dragon from ISS. Photo Credit: Twitter
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Also Read: SkyPerfect JSAT Collabs with SpaceX to Launch a Satellite in 2024

Author

  • Russell Chattaraj

    Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

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