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Sunday, September 25, 2022

Green Hydrogen: Researchers Claim to Have Found a Way to Produce It

This type of H2 is often produced using water electrolysis, driven by renewable energy sources

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Russell Chattaraj
Russell Chattaraj
Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

UNITED STATES: Using water at normal temperature, scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) have discovered a new method for producing green hydrogen.

Producing Green hydrogen by using water

Green hydrogen production as a whole is nothing new. This type of H2 is often produced using water electrolysis, driven by renewable energy sources like solar or wind energy. In this way, neither its manufacture nor use emits greenhouse gases.

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Water electrolysis, sometimes referred to as electrochemical water splitting, is a technique that uses electricity to split the oxygen and hydrogen molecules in water.

The UCSC researchers have discovered a method to finish the procedure at room temperature without requiring an electric input. They created a unique aluminium composite that reacts with the water at ambient temperature.

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Aluminum is a naturally reactive substance that will break the oxygen from the water molecules, leaving the H2 behind.

At room temperature, the metal forms a coating of aluminium oxide that acts as a barrier between it and the water and prevents the reaction, so this doesn’t just happen on its own.

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The scientists found that by using an inexpensive composite of gallium and aluminium, the aluminium will react with water even at ambient temperature, producing H2 without emitting CO2. No more electricity is required in this approach.

According to a recent press release from the university, chemistry professor Scott Oliver remarked, “We don’t require any energy input, and it bubbles hydrogen-like crazy. It’s unlike anything I’ve ever seen.”

It has long been known that gallium and aluminium may combine to create hydrogen from water. The UCSC research team found that increasing the composite’s gallium to aluminium content also increased the amount of green hydrogen produced due to its presence.

Using a modest amount of aluminium, Oliver continued, “ensures that it all dissolves into the majority gallium as distinct nanoparticles.”

Author

  • Russell Chattaraj

    Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

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