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James Webb Telescope Captures an Elegant Image of Jupiter

Astronomers are interested in Jupiter and its moon system because they believe there may be signs of life there

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Russell Chattaraj
Russell Chattaraj
Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

UNITED STATES: Weeks after transmitting the first breathtaking scientific images from the edge of time, the James Webb Telescope is currently analysing the planets in our solar system. Astronomers have released a new image of Jupiter that was captured by the largest telescope in the world.

The largest planet in the solar system is depicted in the new black and white photograph shining in the blackness of space, with its famous Great Red Spot seeming dazzling white. The raw image, which highlights the planet’s distinctive features, was taken on July 27 by the telescope’s Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) instrument.

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To better understand the research occurring on and around the planet, the Webb team is keeping an eye on it. Jupiter and its moon system are of interest to astronomers because they believe there may be signs of life there. With the aid of the telescope, researchers can understand better thermal structures, winds, aurora, and other unusual planetary phenomena.

The telescope has previously examined Jupiter; this is not a new discovery. The spaceship directed its potent optics at Jupiter during a test run.
The photographs of Jupiter in all its splendour captured during the flying observatory’s commissioning have been made public by NASA. The image was published in the Space Telescope Science Institute’s Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes.

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The telescope, 15,00,000 kilometres from home, was peering at Jupiter when it noticed distinct bands encircling the planet and the Great Red Spot, a storm large enough to consume the Earth. The recognisable point in this image appears white because of how Webb’s infrared photo was edited.
Using the F212N filter, which detects light with a wavelength of 2.12 microns, or roughly the length of a common bacteria, the spacecraft studied Jupiter for 11 minutes during its most recent observation.

This week’s observations will concentrate on the massive asteroid Hygeia, the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, and Jupiter’s volcanic moon Io, according to the Space Telescope Science Institute in Maryland runs the telescope.

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Astronomers will also use Webb to investigate the intriguing hypothesis of whether we can observe material plumes erupting from moons like Europa and Saturn’s moon Enceladus.

Also Read: James Webb Telescope Clicks Spectacular Pictures of the Cartwheel Galaxy

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  • Russell Chattaraj

    Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

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