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NASA’s Mars InSight Lander Bids Its Final Farewell as it Approaches Death

The solar panels on the lander's solar-powered battery charger have been severely harmed by martian dust

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Russell Chattaraj
Russell Chattaraj
Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

UNITED STATES: The NASA Interior Exploration utilising Seismic Investigations, often known as the InSight lander, is nearing the end of its mission on Mars after recording quakes one by one and listening to the sounds of rumbling beneath the surface. 

The solar panels on the lander’s solar-powered battery charger have been severely harmed by martian dust, so the mission will unavoidably end.

The project team explained that adding a dust wiper to the lander would have increased the mission’s cost, bulk, and complexity, and that bringing large solar panels to power the entire mission was the most practical method to achieve the objectives.

The lander, which is barely hanging on by a thread, tweeted, “I’m coming close to the end here, due to dust building on my solar panels, making it impossible to generate power.” “Power is running out quickly, and most of the science operations have been turned entirely off.”

The solar panels performed as expected, and although the mission was designed to last for one Mars year (about two Earth years), the InSight lander operated for twice that amount of time after touching down on Mars. 

The satellite has identified and verified more than 1,300 earthquake occurrences. The team was able to locate more than 50 of them on Mars since they all transmitted signals that were sufficiently clear.

InSight gathered fresh information about the crust, mantle, and core of Mars. The crust under InSight was found to be a little thinner than expected, according to researchers.

They used seismic waves that travelled through a depth of roughly 800 kilometres before emerging to study the upper mantle.

The probe gathered the most comprehensive weather data of any mission conducted to the surface of Mars, despite being struck by dust devils that added to the buildup of lethal dust on its panels.

Thousands of dust devils in motion have been picked up by its sensors.

The mission’s current priorities include storing its vast data collection and making it available to scientists worldwide. 

NASA will declare the mission a failure if InSight fails to communicate successfully with craft orbiting Mars twice in a row. The lander, however, should be held accountable for the broken connection.

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Also Read: NASA’s Artemis 1 Suffered Minor Blows Due to Hurricane Nicole 

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  • Russell Chattaraj

    Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

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