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NASA Merges Two Images of Pillars of Creation Taken by JWST to Create a Stunning Picture 

This image was captured using Webb's near-infrared camera (NIRCam)

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Russell Chattaraj
Russell Chattaraj
Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

UNITED STATES: NASA merges two different images of the pillars of creation taken by the James Webb Space Telescope to produce a stunning fresh image.

The breathtaking view of the pictures provided a ethereal touch which formed a dreamy sequence. The shining stars surrounding the pillars of creations emerged as a wonders of space.

NASA fused the image taken in near-infrared and mid-infrared

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The image was taken in mid-infrared region to produce the mentioned image. At the periphery of the dusty pillars, there are thousands of almost-formed stars that resemble dazzling orange-red spheres.

This image was captured using Webb’s near-infrared camera (NIRCam) because stars typically emit near-infrared light. The dusty look in the image is the focus of Webb’s mid-infrared instrument (MIRI), though.

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The layers of hazy, orange dust that cover the top of the photograph make this the most apparent. Our perspective of the events carried on inside the dense pillars is obscured by the deep indigo colours cast upon the densest regions of dust.

The region is teeming with stars because dust is a crucial component in star formation. In this scene, almost everything is local.

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The interstellar medium, which is composed of sparse gas and dust found between the stars, as well as a dense dust lane in our Milky Way galaxy, substantially limits our perspective of the distant universe. 

As a result, in Webb’s interpretation of the Pillars of Creation, the stars take centre stage. The Eagle Nebula, which spans 6,500 light-years, contains the sparsely populated Pillars of Creation.

NIRCam was developed by collaborating with the University of Arizona and Lockheed Martin’s Advanced Technology Center.

A consortium of publicly financed European Institutes (The MIRI European Consortium), in collaboration with JPL and the University of Arizona, planned and built MIRI with support from ESA and NASA.

Also Read: NASA’s Hubble Telescope Captures Spectacular Image of NGC 2660 Star Cluster

Author

  • Russell Chattaraj

    Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

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