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NASA’s Apollo 9 Astronaut James McDivitt Passes Away

NASA claims that James McDivitt died peacefully in his sleep in Tuscon

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Russell Chattaraj
Russell Chattaraj
Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

UNITED STATES: NASA announced on October 18 that James A. McDivitt, also known as Jim McDivitt, who led the Apollo 9 mission in 1969, passed away at the age of 93. 

The organisation claims that McDivitt died peacefully in his sleep in Tuscon, Arizona, while being attended by his friends and family. McDivitt, a Korean War veteran, had a distinguished career and received numerous honours during his lifetime.

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McDivitt, who was born on June 10, 1929, attended Kalamazoo Central High School in Michigan before graduating as the best student in his class with a Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Engineering from the University of Michigan. 

He enlisted in the U.S. Air Force in 1951 and accrued more than 5,000 flying hours throughout his career as a pilot, which included 145 combat flights in the F-80 and F-86 fighter jets during the Korean War.

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He received two Air Force Distinguished Service Medals, four Distinguished Flying Crosses, five Air Medals, and the U.S. for his military service. The Chong Moo Medal and Air Force Astronaut Wings from South Korea and the U.S. The Sword of Loyola, the Arnold Air Society JFK Trophy, the Air Force Systems Command Aerospace Primus Award, and the Michigan Wolverine Frontiersman Award.

When McDivitt joined NASA’s second astronaut class in September 1962, his career there officially began. He was soon chosen to fly with fellow Air Force pilot Ed White on the Gemini IV mission in June 1965 as its commander. Gemini IV is regarded as one of the most daring missions because it saw White do an extravehicular activity (EVA), also known as a spacewalk, outside of his ship.

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Additionally, the Apollo Program flights benefited from McDivitt’s knowledge. He was chosen to lead Apollo 9, which lifted out on March 3, 1969, from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. 

The mission included engineering tests of the first crewed lunar module as well as manoeuvres that would be carried out during actual lunar missions, with Command Module Pilot David Scott and Lunar Module Pilot Russell Schweickart also participating. 

He was chosen to lead the programme through the Apollo 9, Apollo 12, Apollo 13, Apollo 14, and Apollo 15 missions after being designated manager of lunar landing operations.

Also Read: NASA Plans to Develop an Inflatable Heat Shield for Planets with Thin Atmosphere

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  • Russell Chattaraj

    Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

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