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WFP and EIF Join Hands to Help Drive Namibia Towards Zero Hunger

The organizations also pointed on the issues related to the lack of diversification in terms of food production

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Ishita Chakraborty
Ishita Chakraborty
Editor-in-Chief at Transcontinental Times, Computer Science Graduate, PG diploma in Journalism and Mass communication. Ishita is a youth activist for PETA India, President of Girlup IWO, and a linguaphile. She covers social issues, politics, UN initiatives, sports, and diversity.

NAMIBIA: The World Food Programme (WFP) and the Environmental Investment Fund (EIF) have made a joint effort to accelerate the journey towards zero hunger by 2030 and to strengthen the government’s capacity. The Zero Hunger is a Sustainable Development Goal (SDG), an initiative by the United Nations. This SDG goal focuses on finding sustainable solutions to fight world hunger. The main goal is to provide nutritious foods to people by 2030 and fight food insecurity.

Joint efforts by WFP and EIF

Namibia produces about 40 percent of the food it consumes and is highly dependent on imports. This means that while food is available, price fluctuations can make it difficult to access for 28 percent of Namibian families to access food.

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Recently, the WFP and EIF have signed an agreement to collaborate and work towards SDG goals 2 (zero hunger), 13 (climate action), and 17 (partnerships).

The WFP is authorized to ensure vulnerable populations in Namibia strengthen their food systems. Currently, many households have high levels of nutrient deficiency. With high levels of stunting, the food insecurity issue in Namibia is becoming a matter of concern.

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To speed up the journey towards accomplishing the zero hunger goal, the WFP has identified three strategic pillars of rural transformation, sustainable food systems, and human capital development as key areas to focus on. The WFP and EIF are dedicated to making combined efforts to fight the problem by supporting the country’s government.

WFP country director George Fedha has also promised to prioritize women and youth empowerment, advancements in digital transformation, and building new employment opportunities.

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EIF CEO Benedict Libanda has said that in order to achieve the SDGs by 2030, the industries, as well as individuals, need to develop knowledge about materials and financial resources to ensure the safety of the people and conservation of natural environments in Namibia.

“For this reason, the EIF is ready to partner with entities such as the WFP as a demonstration of our commitment to championing SDGs. We need to work together to find solutions that are sustainable and durable, and that recognizes our interdependence as institutions,” he noted.

The causes of food insecurity in Nigeria

The organizations also pointed on the issues related to the lack of diversification in terms of food production. In Namibia, local food production is mostly dominated by the production of maize, millet, and sorghum. Due to this, there has been a lack of attention to other nutrient-dense crops.

In Namibia, 70% of people rely on market access for food. Hence, the high dependence on food imports, where the country imports 60% of its total needs is a matter of concern.

Climate change has a major impact on food production. WFP and EIF have indicated that this is evident for a country like Namibia that has experienced floods and droughts for the past 10-15 years. This has led to a reduction in food production and over-dependence on food imports.

Additionally, limited access to markets has impacted the commercialization process of smallholder farmers. This has made them difficult to deal with commercial farmers.
Along with this, smallholder farmers are also more vulnerable to climate shocks, which vulnerability results from 100% dependence on rained agriculture.

Also Read: Rising Food Prices: A Global Concern

Author

  • Ishita Chakraborty

    Editor-in-Chief at Transcontinental Times, Computer Science Graduate, PG diploma in Journalism and Mass communication. Ishita is a youth activist for PETA India, President of Girlup IWO, and a linguaphile. She covers social issues, politics, UN initiatives, sports, and diversity.

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