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Geomagnetic Storm from ‘Cyclops-Like’ Hole in Sun to Hit Earth Today

As solar storms become more frequent, space weather experts are working hard to develop ways to fortify Earth's defences

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Russell Chattaraj
Russell Chattaraj
Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

INDIA: The Sun’s atmosphere has a ‘Cyclops-Like Hole’ that is shooting solar winds at Earth and could set off a geomagnetic storm on July 6.

The situation at the centre of our solar system, more than 150 million kilometres distant, is not quite the same as here on Earth, where nothing outside of the ordinary interrupts our daily routines. 

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The Sun is getting close to its solar maxima, the point in its 11-year solar cycle when it is most active. Furthermore, it has recently gone through a particularly temperamental phase, exhibiting its annoyance by launching coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and other phenomena. A CME that just missed Earth last week triggered two ‘geomagnets’. 

The Sun now has a hole in its atmosphere, and people are comparing it with the Cyclops from the X-Men universe, who could fire intense energy beams from his eyes. According to spaceweather.com, gaseous material is fleeing the solar atmosphere through this hole. 

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Now, according to NOAA’s forecast, the stream of solar wind moving in the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field will cause a mild geomagnetic storm of the G1 classification to strike our planet on Wednesday, July 6 (Today). 

Fortunately, G1-class storms are not very strong and do not significantly interfere with GPS devices. Although they might cause only slight changes in the electricity system, minimal interference with satellite operations, and abnormally large auroras. Additionally, they might impair the ability of some migratory animals to navigate. 

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As solar storms become more frequent, space weather experts are working hard to develop ways to fortify Earth’s defences against the unstable solar weather since a strong flare might cause catastrophic damage to our planet.

Also Read: Black Hole: The Most Intriguing Paradox in Astronomy

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  • Russell Chattaraj

    Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

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