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ISRO Successfully Conducts EMI Test for the Chandrayan-3 Lander

The test for the Chandrayaan-3 lander took place between January 31 and February 2 at the U R Rao Satellite Centre

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Russell Chattaraj
Russell Chattaraj
Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

INDIA: The Electromagnetic Interference/Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMI/EMC) test for the Chandrayaan-3 lander took place between January 31 and February 2 at the U. R. Rao Satellite Centre, according to a statement from the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) on Sunday.

ISRO says that the EMI/EMC test is done for satellite missions to ensure that the satellite’s subsystems are compatible with the expected electromagnetic levels and will work properly in space.

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It was stated that this test was a significant turning point in the satellites’ development. According to the space agency, the Chandrayaan-3 interplanetary project contains three main parts. 

The mission’s complexity necessitates setting up radio-frequency (RF) communication links between these three modules: the propulsion module, the lander module, and the Rover.

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“Chandrayaan-3’s lander underwent a number of tests to make sure that it was compatible with the launcher. These tests included an EMI/EC test, antenna polarisation of all RF systems, stand-alone auto compatibility testing for the orbital and powered descent mission phases, and lander and Rover compatibility testing for the post-landing mission phase. The systems’ performance was adequate,” it added.

As a follow-up mission to Chandrayaan-2, Chandrayaan-3 aims to show that safe lunar landing and wandering are possible from beginning to end.

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It will be launched by GSLV MkIII from Sriharikota’s Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC) and outfitted with a Land Rover and an electric propulsion system.

The propulsion module will propel the Lander and Rover configurations to a 100-kilometre lunar orbit. The Spectro-Polarimetry of Habitable Planet Earth (SHAPE) payload aboard the propulsion module allows researchers to examine spectral and polarimetric readings of Earth from the lunar orbit.

The Langmuir Probe (LP), Chandra’s Surface Thermophysical Experiment (ChaSTE), and Instrument for Lunar Seismic Activity (ILSA) are included in the Lander payloads. 

Chandra’s Surface Thermophysical Experiment (ChaSTE) measures thermal conductivity and temperature. A passive NASA Laser Retroreflector Array is available for lunar laser-ranging research.

The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscope (LIBS) are two of the payloads on the Rover that help figure out the elemental makeup close to the landing site.

After ISRO’s Chandrayaan-2 mission crashed on the moon, India’s first effort to land a rover there in 2019 was unsuccessful. June is the projected launch date for Chandrayaan-3.

Also Read: ISRO Proposes Different Scenario for the Origin of ‘Lunar Basalt’

Author

  • Russell Chattaraj

    Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

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