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NASA Launches a New Initiative That Allows People to Become a Jovian Vortex Hunter

A new NASA citizen science initiative called Jovian Vortex Hunter needs people's assistance in identifying vortices, spiral wind patterns, and other phenomena in images of the planet Jupiter

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Russell Chattaraj
Russell Chattaraj
Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

UNITED STATES: Another NASA citizen science project, Junocam, asks for the public’s assistance in processing photographs from the Juno Mission and selecting targets for the probe.

However, the new Jovian Vortex Hunter initiative makes it quick and simple for anyone to assist because it offers photographs that the science team has already processed. Understanding Jupiter’s fluid dynamics and cloud chemistry, which produce stunning patterns like bands, spots, and “brown barges,” will help scientists classify the photos.

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Using information from the spacecraft’s JunoCam imager, citizen scientist Kevin M. Gill produced the image (at the top of the article). The spacecraft captured a cyclonic storm in Jupiter’s atmosphere in this incredibly detailed image during its 23rd close flyby of the planet (also known as “perijove 23”).

The “north north north north temperate belt,” or NNNNTB, is one of the several permanent cloud bands on the gas giant planet Jupiter where Juno found this vortex. The dominant winds at various latitudes create these bands. This vortex is around 1,200 miles (2,000 kilometres) in diameter.

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Since Galileo Galilei discovered the first moons outside of Earth in 1610, Jupiter has a long history of shocking astronomers. That finding altered our perspective of the universe.

Jupiter, the fifth planet from the Sun, is by far the largest planet in the solar system, with a mass that is more than twice that of all the other planets.

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The well-known stripes and swirls of Jupiter are ammonia and water clouds floating in a hydrogen and helium atmosphere. These clouds are cold and windy. The famous Great Red Spot on Jupiter is a gigantic storm that has been raging for hundreds of years and is larger than Earth.

The NASA Juno orbiter is the only spacecraft actively examining this enormous planet.

Also Read: Asteroid 101955 Bennu Astounds NASA Experts, Here’s Why

Author

  • Russell Chattaraj

    Mechanical engineering graduate, writes about science, technology and sports, teaching physics and mathematics, also played cricket professionally and passionate about bodybuilding.

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