Minority Women React To Harris’s Likely Rise To Vice Presidency

Minority women hopeful Harris will heal a broken nation

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Lisa Carley Hotaling
Lisa Carley Hotaling
I have a graduate degree in Humanistic Psychology and live in Upstate New York.

UNITED STATES. 24-year-old Komal Kannah is thrilled with the likely election of the first Indian-American woman to the Vice Presidency. Born to Indian immigrants in the Unites States, Kannah is a lifelong Rochester, New York native.

In an interview with Transcontinental Times, Kannah said, “As a woman, a woman of color, and a first generation American, it means finally having representation. It means knowing the true value of the American dream, and the values of hard work and dedication have a chance to be restored.”

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Kannah is a full-time student and works full time as a nursing home aid. She once again has hope that America can live up to its promise of being “what American truly is: a melting pot. Our youth has an opportunity to have an incredible role model and witness the possibilities ahead.“

Harris’s path to vice president

As the ballots continue to be counted in Nevada, Arizona, Pennsylvania, and a breathless populace looks ahead to a recount in Georgia, Americans are coming to terms with the idea of the first woman of color to be elected to the second highest office in the United States.

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Read Also: Women Set To Deliver First Woman To Vice Presidency

57-year-old Kamala Harris from Oakland, California is born of immigrant parents. Her mother immigrated to the US in 1958 to attend UC Berkeley. Her father immigrated from Jamaica in the 1960s. They met in graduate school and divorced when Harris was seven, so she was raised by her single mother. She became a prosecutor and went on to become Attorney General of California in 2011 until 2017 when she became a US Senator. After a failed presidential bid, Harris was picked up by former Vice President Joe Biden and Democratic Presidential Nominee to be his running mate.

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With 264 of the required 271 electoral votes bagged thus far, Harris is likely to become the first female and the first person of color to win the Vice Presidency.

Even women not able to vote hold stake in the election results

Tara de Souza is a Green Card holder from Mumbai, living in New York City. Not yet a citizen, 26-year-old de Souza is not eligible to vote but felt invested in the 2020 election. “With all of [Trump’s] racist and sexist comments, I was so worried about immigrating to the US in 2018. Being Indian-American and a woman, [Harris] has a lot to offer to heal this country.”

While the United States broke racial barriers in 2008 with the election of the first African American to the Presidency, it has yet to bring a woman to such a level of power. Kamala Harris will not only be the first first-generation executive officer in the White House, but the first Black woman as well.  

Harris brings hope to a beleaguered black community

44-year-old Michelle Hayward, a Rochestarian from South Carolina, has never missed an election and was proud to vote once again. “Thanks to those who came before me, Susan B. Anthony, Martin Luther King, Jr, Malcom X, and so many others…I am so excited that we as women and women of color are advancing. It shows that the stereotypes about people of color are just that: stereotypes. We are resilient, passionate, nurturing, and so much more.”

America has been rocked in 2020 with ongoing protests in the wake of several murders of Black citizens committed by police officers. Many saw it as a crucial time to bring a woman of color into a key leadership position in the White House.

Read Also: Protests Continue For 6th Night In Rochester New York

Hayward continued, “I am so proud to not just see a woman but a woman of color to be in line to be the Vice President of these United States of America!!”

Women have long leaned Democratic and this election was no exception. Minority women prefer Biden and Harris 84% more than Trump and if the Biden/Harris snags the remaining electoral college votes, it will likely be because of minority female support.

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